Even the Illinois Supreme Court Misses Obvious Typos

As a law clerk, I'm amazed at how difficult it is to ensure that a filed opinion is free from typos. You'd think that between multiple law clerks, multiple judges, the research director, and the reporter of opinions, every possible typo in an opinion would be detected. I'm convinced that it's impossible.

This is from the Illinois supreme court's recent opinion in People v. Fernandez, 2014 IL 115527, ΒΆ 5:

"Defendant also stated that he was not going to a hospital because he did want to get the police involved."

Unless Mr. Fernandez is a very illogical person, I believe that sentence was supposed to read, "Defendant also stated that he was not going to a hospital because he did not want to get the police involved."

I can't blame Justice Thomas or his clerks for this error. We are wired to read what we think a sentence means, not what it actually says. It's just impossible to catch everything. 

UPDATE (6/23/14): I notified the Reporter of Decisions about the typo in Fernandez about two months ago. No update at this time. I will continue to update on whether there are any updates. If no updates are required, I will so inform. Until then, do not expect any more updates on this matter.